Did You Know That Latinas Have A Higher Incidence Of Getting Cervical Cancer?

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Did You Know That Latinas Have A Higher Incidence Of Getting Cervical Cancer?
Did You Know That Latinas Have A Higher Incidence Of Getting Cervical Cancer?
Video: Did You Know That Latinas Have A Higher Incidence Of Getting Cervical Cancer?
Video: Cervical Cancer Statistics | Did You Know? 2023, February
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Did you know that Latino women are more likely to get cervical cancer? Although the main cause of this is unknown, specialists believe that it is due to the following factors: taboos in relation to regular gynecological visits, lack of follow-up in treatments, little access to health services and discomfort in gynecological examinations

All these factors are highly preventable and can make the difference between an early diagnosis that helps improve the patient.

Dr. Edward C. Patriquin, an obstetrician-gynecologist at Kaiser Permanente in South Sacramento, California, explains that cervical cancer develops when changes occur in the cervix, where cancerous tissues can grow abnormally invading other organs of the uterus. pelvis and body.

"Cancer of the cervix develops from infection with the human papilloma virus (HPV), which is a sexually transmitted virus," says the expert. Therefore, it is normal (and very likely) for any sexually active person to contract the virus at some point in their life.

However, getting the virus does not necessarily mean that the cancer will appear. That is why it is recommended to be constant in gynecological visits, in order to have under control any abnormality in our body. And, in addition, cervical cancer does not present symptoms, but until very advanced stages.

"Usually cervical cancer has no symptoms until it is advanced. Irregular bleeding, especially after menopause, can be a sign. However, the abnormal bleeding is usually not from cervical cancer, but from other causes, "explains the specialist.

Although there is no cure for cervical cancer, the best way to prevent it is with the HPV vaccine, which is recommended to apply to girls and boys from 11 years of age. Also, attending regular gynecological visits and having Pap tests are habits that help with early detection.

"Women who do not receive their preventive exams are more likely to have advanced cervical cancer. In contrast, the vast majority of abnormal injuries we find from women who go for their preventive exams are cancers that have not progressed and that we can easily remove before they invade other parts of the body, "adds Edward C. Patriquin.

If nothing abnormal is found during your gynecological visits, you can do them every three years, according to the specialist. In addition, girls and women between the ages of 9 and 45 can receive the HPV vaccine. Also, quitting smoking is key to reducing the occurrence of cervical cancer.

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